How to make marketing demographics psychobabble work for your writing

How to make marketing demographics psychobabble work for your writing

Next in the marketing for writers series…

Marketing Demographics

Once you have thought about your “whys” of your writing (business):

  • What made you start writing? What is your “why” or your writing story?
  • What desire or need does your writing fulfill for others?
  • What makes your writing unique?
  • What qualities do you offer as a writer that makes your reader better off for having read your work vs. not reading you at all?

(If you haven’t thought about your “whys” yet read more in the introduction to the marketing for writers series.)

Now it is time to think about objections and demographics. Try to answer the following questions about your writing as it relates to your readers:

Objections

1. Are there any drawbacks to what you are offering to your readers (or your clients)?

For example, if you are a writing coach one objection might be:

It is difficult to quantify success with the writing process, or to have a final completed goal to call something “done.” There are many variables at play between the writer and coach, with the writer’s process that is not always set in stone and with the writing market in general.

2. As a follow-up to the previous question, are there any common objections that come up?

Staying with the same example, if you are a writing coach, a client may wonder, “How will I know if you can really help me? What proof can I see ahead of time? Is this a waste of my time? What guarantees do I have that my money isn’t just going down the drain?”

Or as an author, “How do I know if your book will be any good or help me?”

3. What will the reader, or you client lose if they don’t take you up on your offering now?

Writing coach example answer: they miss out on not taking their own work seriously enough to subject it to a process to make it stronger and to encourage growth and success.

Demographics and Psycho-graphics

1. What’s your target reader or client demographic? Age, income level, gender, occupation, etc. — the more information the better.

As an example here is my (long-winded) answer:

My target demographic is older women and men, with some education, a mid to high income, who have enough spare time to write and to work on improving their writing. They are also far enough along on a book or writing project that they are beginning to think about how they are going to promote it. Or they are just beginning and are worried that they need an author platform in order to get published. Or they have completed their project, have set up their website, etc., some social media but are struggling to get any traction — followers, etc.

My mission is to help all writers who struggle to get published, especially bloggers. More than this I’m trying to help with authenticity, finding your voice as a writer, being vulnerable, transparent, creating connections, and a community. And who want independence and freedom as writers as in their life.

2. What are their top 3 fears related to your niche? In other words, what keeps them up at night?

Again, my example answers:

  • That I won’t finish my book/project
  • That it will suck
  • That I’ll self-publish and no one will notice
  • That I’ve spent all this time and trouble writing and marketing and it is still going nowhere
  • That I can’t find or express my authentic voice
  • That I am writing in a vacuum — I have no connections

3. How does your service or product address those fears?

My example answers:

  • I will model authentic writing
  • I will provide accountability as a coach to stay on task
  • I will provide services to improve writing
  • I will provide promotion and can teach them to promote their own work
  • I will provide emotional counseling and help them with new ideas and avenues for marketing

Homework

Try to answer the above questions about marketing demographics for your service or product in your marketing workbook (hint: create a dedicated document or journal for this series, trust me, these answers will be very valuable as you build your writing or other business). Don’t worry if you are fuzzy about some of them, and some may change over time — this is totally natural. Mine have changed some since I first wrote them a few months ago.

Your Reading Assignment

Note: Some of the books I recommend will focus on advertising. Think of learning advertising as a master class in making your writing more popular. Many books on my marketing reading list come from Jon Morrow, so rest assured these titles are powerful and important for writers too.

CA$HVERTISING: How to Use More than 100 Secrets of Ad-Agency Psychology to Make Big Money Selling Anything to Anyone

(Yes, the cover is damn cheesy, but the contents are gold.)

I discuss the secrets of this incredible book in depth starting here:

In the next lesson in this series, I will talk about results and doing a brief competitive analysis.

Marketing for writers: Why this writer loves marketing (how you can too!)

Marketing for writers: Why this writer loves marketing (how you can too!)

Marketing for writers

It is no secret that many successful writers and bloggers everywhere use the principles of copywriting to give their message more power and influence.

Advertising is only evil when it advertises evil things. — David Ogilvy

It is also no secret that most writers would like to earn money or their entire living from their writing. If this is true for you, then, understanding the psychology and principles behind advertising, marketing, and copywriting is essential.

Get to know your readers

Like any marketing effort, as a writer, you need to understand your readers. Ask yourself:

  1. What do your readers want?*
  2. How do they feel about what they want?
  3. Why do they act the way they do?

Once you can answer these questions, you can:

  1. Better understand what and how to write
  2. Write with emotions that your readers will relate to
  3. Reach a bigger reader base with your targeted writing
  4. Provide your readers more satisfaction by doing all of the above

*What do your readers really want?

According to Drew Eric Whitman (affiliate link), humans (i.e. your readers) have 8 needs or desires:

  1. Survival, enjoyment of life, life extension
  2. Enjoyment of food and beverages
  3. Freedom from fear, pain, and danger
  4. Sexual companionship
  5. Comfortable living conditions
  6. To be superior, winning, keeping up with the Joneses
  7. Care and protection of loved ones
  8. Social approval

Whitman provides some pretty convincing evidence (you’ll have to read the book) why tapping into one or more of these eight desires can dramatically affect sales, or in our case, readership.

People buy because of emotion and justify with logic. Force an emotional response by touching on a basic want or need. — “Seven Principles of Stopping Power,” The Young & Rubicam Traveling Creative Workshop

Homework

Before you publish your next article or longer work, fiction or nonfiction, think deeply about which of the eight needs or desires your writing topic most reflects. Can you capitalize on this knowledge with a change in title, or with an increased focus or theme?

Let us know about your homework results!


This article is meant to whet your marketing appetite. I am writing an entire series on marketing for writers. Please join me for more and little by little we will learn together to love marketing (or at least make it less painful).

Marketing for Writers – How to Love Marketing Even if You Don’t

Marketing for Writers – How to Love Marketing Even if You Don’t

Marketing for writers or how to make sweet marketing love for writers that don’t (love marketing)

Yes, it is sweet to imagine that you can just write and write non-stop. Sit under that tree and wax poetic. Ahhh, life is good.

No Twittering, Facebooking, Instagramming, Snap Chatting social media to update with your latest lunch epiphanies. No email list to build and build. No themes or new plug-ins to figure out and update. No writing of auto-response emails that suck the life-force out of every cell.

You get the idea. Marketing your writing is a real PITA.

You’re a writer, Gumby Damnit! Why should you care about marketing for writers?

And most of the time you have no idea if any of it is working. Or worse, you live in an echo-chamber of many loud crickets. HELLO!! hello, Anyone out there?!

But we all know it is necessary. In this huge world of shiny new objects every two seconds, you have to find a way to get your voice heard. You need to learn to love and embrace the creativity that it takes to get noticed.

Advertising is only evil when it advertises evil things. — David Ogilvy

Yes, marketing can be creative, and it can be fun. But where to start and what to do to know you are on the right track? I do have answers and I hope you will follow along with me as I present a series of marketing for writers “how-to” articles.

These articles will consist of some questions to answer and (at times) actionable steps. I will also recommend one marketing or closely related book that you should read.

I also suggest that you start a new dedicated marketing document “workbook” to keep all your answers. You will be amazed at what you come up with and all the ideas that begin to flow. Make sure you can keep it all together to so that you can refer back.

Sometimes I will include my (highly) personal answers as examples. Please ignore them if you wish, they are only there as a guide to jump start your thinking.

It is the ultimate luxury to combine passion and contribution. It’s also a very clear path to happiness. — Sheryl Sandberg

So, here is the first article / Q&A lesson for the Marketing for Writers series. Ready? Let’s get started!


Understanding Your Business (writing)

1. What made you start writing? What is your “why” or your writing story?

Example: Here is my simple answer for Daily Muse Books and my personal blog: I love to blog. I like to read about writing. I like to help writers. I love books. I enjoy marketing and have enjoyed helping writers and others with social media, blogging, and marketing.

2. What desire or need does your writing fulfill for others?

Example: My main service is to help writers with their craft and marketing so that they can do what they love full time. Many writers have a burning desire to do nothing but write, or at least to be able to write more.

3. What makes your writing unique?

Example: Other writers can leverage my mistakes. I have learned through many marketing mistakes. I have worked in many industries, and have owned several companies in which I did the marketing myself. As a writer myself, I am especially drawn to writers and have a heart to help them so they do not become overwhelmed with marketing and can in fact learn to enjoy it as a creative outlet.

4. What qualities do you offer as a writer that makes your reader better off for having read your work vs. not reading you at all?

Example: It is unique because I also have several advanced degrees including in psychology. This helps me work with the feeling aspect of being a writer and marketer. Writing involves our emotions to a high degree. Sometimes it is helpful to know why resistances, such as procrastination exists. I have also studied working with dreams. If we let our unconscious do some of the work at night, it is amazing what epiphanies can occur. Sleeping on a project before clicking “publish” usually aids insights and complexities that we miss in our rush to finish.

Your Reading Assignment

Note: Some of the books I recommend will focus on advertising. Think of learning advertising as a master class in making your writing more popular. Many books on my marketing reading list come from Jon Morrow, so rest assured these titles are powerful and important for writers too.

CA$HVERTISING: How to Use More than 100 Secrets of Ad-Agency Psychology to Make Big Money Selling Anything to Anyone (affiliate links)

 

Drew Eric Whitman takes you on a wild, roller-coaster ride through the streets of New York’s famed Madison Avenue and teaches you the specific psychological techniques that today’s top copywriters and designers use to influence the masses… and how you can use them to rapidly increase your sales, no matter what you sell.

I have written more on Whitman’s book here:

And if you are a fast reading fool, you can view the full marketing reading list here:

Finally, I’d love to hear your answers to the four questions above in the comment/responses!